English-language Wikipedia claims that Djujic and Jevdjevic are Nazis!

Chicago, 1951: Jevđević and Đujić with the Chetniks, after the congress of the Organization Serbian Chetniks in the Free World

Chicago, 1951: Jevđević and Đujić with the Chetniks, after the congress of the Organization Serbian Chetniks in the Free World

Author: Miloslav Samardzic

We know that the Serbian-language Wikipedia is in the hands of people who advocate communist propaganda but things are even worse when it comes to the English-language Wikipedia. There it can be read that Serb World War II vojvodas (dukes) Momcilo Djujic and Dobroslav Jevdjevic belonged to formations of the Kingdom of Italy and Nazi Germany! Under their photographs where it says allegiance, there are even the flags of the Kingdom of Italy and Nazi Germany but there is no flag for the country that they were fighting for: the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. Of course, there is not even an elementary description of what they were doing during the war so the reader can only be confused while reading what is in the article. For example, readers will be confused as to how the vojvodas received the state order of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia – the Order of Karadjordje’s Star – if they belonged to Italian and German units (the Kingdom of Yugoslavia was part of the western Allies). We can also see the classic lies of war crimes: vojvoda Djujic is accused of 1,500 while vojvoda Jevdjevic is accused of 543 to 2,500 deaths! Again, this can only confuse the reader (which is intended by the authors of the article) because in the articles, it says that both of the vojvodas lived in Western countries. It even states that the countries that they lived in refused to extradite them to the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

The reader should know that Western countries put to trial numerous fascist and Nazi war criminals which were then extradited to their country of origin – war criminals such as Andrija Artukovic for example. What are the sources of these Wikipedia articles? The sources mainly come from communist authors from the former Yugoslavia along with authors who for some reason believed the propaganda coming from the Communist Party of Yugoslavia. We can see the often-spotted Croat emigrant Jozo Tomasevich along with British authors from the era when England supported communist Yugoslavia. This explains why British historiography from this era in most ways sounds like communist propaganda. Modern-day British historiography (take for example the book by Peter Betty and Heather Williams) has moved far from the Cold War versions. If modern-day authors were used, these types of biographies could not be written about these two vojvodas. At last, it’s obvious that some other emigrants from the former Yugoslavian areas were much more active in this case than were Serbian emigrants.

(Serbian Newspaper, Chicago, June 2016, No 692)

Posted in Press

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